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Stay-At-Home Moms Should Be Paid Over $184K A Year To Care For Their Kids, States Report
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Stay-At-Home Moms Should Be Paid Over $184K A Year To Care For Their Kids, States Report

The report has calculated the estimated salary of a stay-at-home parent.

Representational Image Source: Getty Images/ Oliver Rossi
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Editor’s note: This article was originally published on July 23, 2021. It has since been updated.

We all know being a parent is no easy task and it looks like you can put a price on being a parent at home! Full-time motherhood is a full-time, 24/7 all-hands-on-deck job. Stay-at-home parents often spend a lot of time cooking, cleaning, caring for little ones, and this job often comes with few or no breaks. A survey by Salary.com gathered “a handful of jobs that reflect a day in the life of a mom” and determined that stay-at-home moms should be making about $184,820 annually. Researchers found that moms who stay at home take on a bunch of “hybrid” roles that are similar to what they do at home (without the pay!). This included both traditional roles like a housekeeper, dietitian, and daycare teacher – and newer roles – like network administrator, social media communications, and recreational therapist. In 2018, the estimated salary was calculated to be just over $162,000. In 2019, it was determined to be about $178,000. That's a 9.6 percent increase! From 2009 to 2015, the salary was between $112,000 and $122,000. In 2016, it had a significant increase from $113,568 to $143,102.

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"Parents hold the ultimate hybrid job at home. They’re CEOs, judges, academic advisors, and so much more,” said Sarah Reynolds, Vice President of Marketing at Salary.com in 2019. “The role of mom requires a diverse skill set that commands serious market value in the talent market, and with new demands on mom’s time arising every day, we only expect their market value to increase in the future. The immense dedication and work ethic of modern moms does not go unnoticed or unappreciated, and we were not at all surprised at the increased salary we calculated this year, nor do we expect this pace of growth to slow over the next five years.”