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8 Minor Changes In Your Body You Should Not Ignore

8 Minor Changes In Your Body You Should Not Ignore

The human body has a way of giving indicators of underlying deficiencies or diseases in the form of certain body changes. While some of them are very common, it would be foolish to ignore these signs.

Hypochondria is the condition where an individual believes that every slight deviation from optimal health could potentially mean something far more sinister. While this is a serious condition, it would be counterproductive to completely ignore the small signs our body gives us about being unwell, just because we don't want to blow it out of proportion. At times you need to take notice of minor body changes like the ones mentioned below before it's too late:

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Unsplash

 

1. Nails

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iStock

Discoloration or any abnormality, for that matter, of nails is a warning sign. While a yellowish tinge to the nails could indicate liver and gastric tract disorders or even a fungal infection, the appearance of white spots or lines hints towards a lack of zinc, copper, and iodine. Whereas brittle nails appear due to a lack of vitamins, calcium, or iron, thin pale nails could be an indication of anemia. 

2. Thinning eyebrows

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Unsplash

Eyebrow trends keep changing every year. While the 2000s were all about ultra-thin eyebrows, the beauty gurus have thankfully moved onto fuller healthy-looking eyebrows. Trendy or not, thick eyebrows are an indicator of good health. Though our bodies do shed hair periodically, a sudden and excessive loss of eyebrow hair is cause for worry. In such cases, where you notice bald spots or even complete disappearance of the eyebrow, refer a doctor asap as it could be an indicator of an excessive or insufficient level of thyroid activity.

3. Dry skin

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iStock

We've all had to deal with dry skin as the climate gets colder. Drinking lots of water, taking vitamins or even a simple moisturizing cream helps deal with the dry patches on the skin in this case. However, if these measures do not seem to be helping, you may want to get a dermatologist's opinion as diabetes and hypothyroidism are known to leave the skin rough and dry. And if your skin is prone to cracking, apart from being dry and peeling off, it could be contact dermatitis caused by chemical exposure.

4. Cracked lips

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iStock

Dry skin that feels itchy and often cracks open is a symptom of  Sj√∂gren syndrome. In this case, it is also accompanied by digestive trouble, dry mouth, and dry eyes. The skin peeling off of your lips could also be an allergic reaction to some food, cosmetics, oral hygiene products, or even medication. If cracks appear in the corners of the mouth, it could be an indication of iron, zinc, or vitamin B deficiency. 

5. Stained teeth

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iStock

Dental fluorosis is caused by the excessive intake of fluoride. Most cases reported are due to children swallowing fluoride toothpaste while the water they drink is pre-fluoridated. Fluorosis appears in different grades, where mild fluorosis shows no to very slight changes, and mild to moderate fluorosis can result in the appearance of white lines, streaks, or spots. Severe fluorosis can lead to teeth becoming pitted and developing brown, gray, or black spots, as well as unusually shaped enamel.

6. Dry heel

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iStock

Deficiency of vitamins, minerals, and zinc in your diet could be the leading cause of dry and cracked heels. This unsightly and painful condition could also be the result of eczema, psoriasis, or diabetes. If it is accompanied by unwanted weight gain, mood swings, irregularity, or fatigue, it could also be a symptom of hypothyroidism. If the condition persists despite regular water intake and a balanced diet, it would be advisable to consult a doctor.

7. Hair loss

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iStock

While it is natural to have a regular hair fall, an excessive loss of hair could be caused by a number of reasons. Hormonal changes, surgeries, and traumatic events can trigger hair fall. However, it can also be caused by medical conditions like thyroid disease, alopecia areata, and scalp infections. It could be due to a lack of protein, iron, and other nutrients in one's diet as well. Persistent hair loss should be checked out by a dermatologist. 

8. Red face

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iStock

The redness of facial skin can be chalked up to a number of reasons. Overexposure to the sun and alcohol consumption are common causes of a red face. However, for older women, it could also be an indicator of menopause. It may also be an indicator of demodicosis, caused due to the presence of infections. A red face is also caused due to rosacea which is triggered by spicy food, alcohol consumption, sunlight, stress, or the presence of intestinal bacteria Helicobacter pylori.

Disclaimer : This article is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.