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7 Undeniable Signs You Are Aging Gracefully When Compared To Your Peers

7 Undeniable Signs You Are Aging Gracefully When Compared To Your Peers

You might have aged and might have undergone some inevitable changes. However, you may not have noticed that aged better than many of the people in your age group.

Aging is a natural process that makes us grow into confident mature people. The wrinkled face and grey hair are unavoidable factors as we progress in age. Rather than looking at it in a negative way, embrace your change as you have aged well. The smile lines on your face and the young enthusiasm you still have are symbols of your good life. Some of us may miss our old bodies and beauty but what you now have is equally beautiful.

Aging gracefully is the way to go as turning the clock back is not a solution. Here are a few unknown signs that tell you have aged well than your peers:

1. You're comfortable spending time with younger people

Socializing is an important aspect of anybody's life regardless of age or gender. It makes us feel enthusiastic and sharp. Added to it, you can learn about new things and develop new hobbies. An evening with some kids around is always better than a coffee alone.

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Associating with children and teenagers is a great way to stay active, though not everyone would be up for an evening with the younger folks. Not only does it require more energy physically, but spending time with people who are from an entirely different generation also tests your interpersonal skills and your knowledge.

2. You have a firm grip

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You may not have those bulging muscles anymore but you still have a firm grip. As you grow older, it is natural for your muscles to grow weak and as the years progress, even holding a cup would be difficult. But you know you have it better when you still have a firm grip even after all these years. Holding a cup of tea steady is not a task for you. According to Harvard Medical School, a good grip is an indication that you are aging well.

3. Your appetite has got a little smaller 

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You might have been one of those people who loved food. However, as you aged you might have noticed that your appetite is not as big as it was once. According to Prevention, around your 60s, your stomach becomes less stretchy and therefore you have little appetite than before. Your brain receives signals telling that your tummy is full even when you are not. 

4. Good self-reported health

This is one of the most unique aspects of aging. You know yourself so well that you can understand any dysfunction or change in your body. It is important for people to be honest enough to point out what they are feeling. By doing this you can prevent any health conditions into becoming something serious. If you decide to go to the doctor immediately, it shows your high alertness. 

5. You can squat

You might have been a workout beast in the past. But, if you can still bend over and pick up something, it is a good sign. It shows that you have aged very well. If squatting is not a difficult task like it is for your peers, you should know that your body limbs, muscles, and bones are strong and healthy. You can keep your muscles active by crouching down once a while. 

6. You spend time with other people

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Humans are social beings. It is normal for people to be interested in social gatherings and meetings. However, when people grow old, they interact less with others which is quite typical for the age group. Spending time with people is vital to remain happy and entertained. Studies show that people who have a healthy social life live longer.

7. Slow but healthy fingernail growth

Remember those old days when checking nails were supposed to be a constant reminder. However, since the growth of nails becomes slower with age, you don't have to worry about it anymore. The growth of your nails might be slow but it is still healthy and strong.

References:

https://www.littlethings.com/aging-gracefully/6
https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1000316
https://www.prevention.com/health/a20508599/appetite-changes-as-you-age/
https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthy-aging/give-grip-strength-a-hand