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Having A Sister Makes You Happier And More Optimistic, Says Study
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Having A Sister Makes You Happier And More Optimistic, Says Study

Those with sisters are encouraged to communicate openly about their feelings which in turn results in a positive outlook

Representational Image Source: Getty Images/ pixelfit
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You're going to start feeling less annoyed with your sister and more grateful to have her in your life after learning about the findings of a recent study. Despite the few times you may have fought with your sibling, you know you're ever-so-glad to have her in your life, right? Now there's research that affirms that having a sister leads to better communication skills and improved mental health. A new study conducted by researchers at De Montfort University and Ulster University discovered that people who grew up with a sister are more likely to be happier than those who didn’t.

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The researchers from Northern Ireland surveyed over 570 people aged between 17 and 25. The participants were asked psychological questions about a number of different topics, including mental health. What they found was that those who grew up with sisters were encouraged to communicate openly about their feelings, and this in turn gave them a more positive outlook on life. According to the Mirror, Professor Tony Cassidy, who carried out the study, said,  "Sisters appear to encourage more open communication and cohesion in families. However, brothers seem to have the alternative effect. Emotional expression is fundamental to good psychological health and having sisters promotes this in families. It could be that boys have a natural tendency not to talk about things. With boys together it is about a conspiracy of silence not to talk. Girls tend to break that down." The study is likely to be helpful for families where the parents had split up, he said, adding, "I think these findings could be used by people offering support to families and children during distressing times. We may have to think carefully about the way we deal with families with lots of boys."