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Do You Feel Pain During Sex? It Could Be A Sign Of Dyspareunia. Here Are 4 Reasons Why It Occurs

Do You Feel Pain During Sex? It Could Be A Sign Of Dyspareunia. Here Are 4 Reasons Why It Occurs

If you experience pain during entry (penetration) or with every penetration, including putting in a tampon and thrusting, and if it is a burning, aching, or throbbing pain that lasts hours after a sexual act, then you may be suffering from this condition.

Movies have incepted a very wrong notion about physical intimacy always being pleasurable. In reality, that's not the case every time especially for women who are conditioned to talk as little as they can in general about intercourse. This not only leads to an unsatisfactory sexual experience but also a painful one. The condition is known as dyspareunia. Per Mayo Clinic, dyspareunia is the medical term used to define painful sex. If you experience pain during entry (penetration) or with every penetration, including putting in a tampon and thrusting, and if it is a burning, aching, or throbbing pain that lasts hours after penetrative sex, then you may be suffering from this condition.

Representative Image source: Getty | Photo by Tharakorn

 

Be rest assured, you're not alone as a study published in the International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology found that of 8869 women between the ages of 16 and 74, 7.5% of sexually active women experienced this pain while having intercourse. "Pain during sex is quite common and can be caused by a variety of things," explains the spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to Dr. Vanessa Mackay while speaking to HuffPost UK. Mentioned below are a few of the most common reasons:

1. Dryness in the vagina

When aroused, the glands at the entrance of your vagina secrets a liquid that helps by reducing friction during intercourse, per Medical News Today. If the fluid released is not ample, it could lead to painful sex. Lack of foreplay, a drop in estrogen levels, and medications like birth control pills, antihistamines, and antidepressants may contribute to this. Consultant gynecologist Amanda Tozer tells The Independent UK that this symptom is very common among menopausal women. "This is because estrogen is no longer produced by the ovaries of women when they reach menopause," she explained.

2. Lack of sexual arousal

This could happen if a person is tired, stressed, or lacks emotional intimacy with their partner. Even the onset of menopause could result in it. If an individual is mentally or physically stressed, it's possible that their sexual appetite is affected as well. In addition to this, there could be underlying health conditions or medications that impact one's sexual drive.

Representative image source: Getty | Photo by Alla Bielikova

3. Irritation or allergies

Dr. Mackay says that pain in the pelvis could be a sign of infection, inflammation, or general irritation. Allergy to soaps, lubricants, or condoms can also lead to painful sex as it irritates the tender skin. Although it's not very common, conditions like fibroids, pelvic inflammatory disease, irritable bowel syndrome, endometriosis, or constipation can also result in discomfort. 

4. Vaginismus

The "involuntary contraction of muscles around the opening of the vagina in women with no abnormalities in the genital organs," is called vaginismus, according to MSD Manuals. This tightening of muscle can cause pain during penetration and even inserting a tampon or menstrual cup. 

Unfortunately, women do not share this prevalent problem that often. Talking to your doctor is the first step as they can help find the cause of those pain and even help manage it. Blogger and founder of the #SaggyBoobsMatter, Chidera Eggerue, explained, "When it comes to intimacy between men and women, the goal for the latter is to be as exciting as possible in order to impress your partner. But the sad and ironic thing is the guy is doing nothing to impress you because he’s been socialized to put himself first." She added, "So it completely makes sense that in a situation where a woman and a man have sex, there is a strong likelihood that she will compromise her need. We need to extend beyond the conversation regarding sex and involve autonomy. Women need to feel comfortable taking control of their bodies and putting their well-being first."

Disclaimer : This article is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.