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Old Navy's Women's Clothing Will Now Come In Sizes 0 to 30, Removing Separate Section For Plus Sizes

Old Navy's Women's Clothing Will Now Come In Sizes 0 to 30, Removing Separate Section For Plus Sizes

Models and mannequins will display clothes in sizes 4, 12, and 18—in-store and online.

Finally! Mainstream clothing brands are heading in the right direction when it comes to inclusivity. Old Navy announced the launch of BODEQUALITY, where women's and women's plus-size collections will be merged. This means every garment in the Old Navy women’s section will be available online and in-store in sizes 0-28 (with size 30 being available exclusively online) in the same styles, for the same price, reports Vogue. Models and mannequins will display clothes in sizes 4, 12, and 18 — in-store and online. Alison Partridge Stickney, Head of Women’s and Maternity Merchandising at Old Navy, shared, “It’s simple, right? If more than half of women in America are plus size, we now have clothes for all of them.”



 

 

“After intensive research where we spent time listening, learning, and walking in our customers’ shoes, it was clear there was an opportunity to do more to meet their needs and make sure that every woman saw herself in our brand,” Nancy Green, President, and CEO of Old Navy, said “BODEQUALITY represents a complete transformation in how we run our business—from the design and production process to our shopping experience across stores and online, and how we engage with our customers across all brand touchpoints. This launch reinforces our brand belief in the democracy of style.” According to Business Wire, Green shared that “BODEQUALITY is not a one-time campaign, but a full transformation of our business in service to our customers based on years of working closely with them to research their needs. I’m proud of the collaboration across our Old Navy teams to evolve the retail experience for women.” The transformation includes its fleet of over 1,200 stores and online shops into fully size-integrated shopping experiences.



 

 

The brand has had trouble in the past when it came to sizing, reports CNN. In 2014, many slammed the brand for charging higher prices for women's plus-size jeans than smaller-size jeans, but not doing the same in men's jeans. A Change.org petition even got close to 100,000 supporters to end Old Navy's "discriminatory pricing practices." The petitioner pointed out, "I was fine paying the extra money as a plus-sized woman, because, you know, more fabric equals higher cost of manufacture. However, selling jeans to larger-sized men at the same cost as they sell to smaller men not only negates the cost of manufacture argument but indicates that Old Navy is participating in both sexism and sizeism, directed only at women." Now the company has worked over the past 3 years taking in customer feedback many of whom described a "dismal" and "excluded" experience of shopping in back sections of retail stores to find their size.



 

 

Old Navy is now offering all their styles in size 0-30 and in-store staff will also get training to address the diversity of clientele size. “We saw that it was going to take more than a rack or a tab on a site and that we had to actually completely revolutionize the way we work,” Partridge Stickney said. “It was this idea of creating a most inclusive shopping experience in the retail industry and making it simple. All products, all sizes, all the same price. It doesn’t matter if you're on our site in our stores, no more guessing games, it's just that straightforward and simple.”