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Having Fresh Flowers Around You Can Reduce Stress And Anxiety, Confirms Research

Having Fresh Flowers Around You Can Reduce Stress And Anxiety, Confirms Research

You can never have a frown on your face when someone sends you flowers.

There's something about flowers that brings a smile on almost instantly. Flowers don't just brighten up the table or add some more color to the room; they can do so much more to lift your mood and even get rid of stress.

The power of flowers

Every time we pause to take a look at the beauty of a flower or take in the scent of a colorful bouquet, we feel an instant joy. It doesn't matter if you were in a low mood or had a tough day at work. Flowers have a way to put us at ease as their bright hues and fragrance are an instant pick-me-up.  New studies suggest that flowers don't just lift your mood, but can have a direct impact on your stress level.  It was found that looking at red roses can make you feel more relaxed and at ease. Not just that, they can even decrease psychological stress, according to this on Complementary Therapies in Medicine.

Photo by Secret Garden from Pexels

 

If you are prone to get worked up or get anxious, one of the best tips is to ensure your environment doesn't add to your stress. Here is where having fresh flowers around you can help a great deal. The vibrant colors and fresh scents can help alter your brain chemistry, as found by another study published by SAGE Journals. It's the perfect mood-booster.

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"Common sense tells us that flowers make us happy," said Jeannette Haviland-Jones, lead researcher of the study and Professor of Psychology at Rutgers, according to Flowerweb. "Now, science shows that not only do flowers make us happier than we know, but they have strong positive effects on our emotional well being."

The next time you step out, bring back some flowers for yourself. Or if you know a friend or family that you think is going through a rough patch, send them a bunch of pretty flowers.

You heal faster in the company of flowers

Not only do flowers make you feel less stressed, but they can also help you heal faster. 

According to the findings of a study published on the American Society for Horticultural Science, when people are around flowers and plants in hospitals, they feel less pain; they are less anxious; they feel less fatigue; feel generally more positive.

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And, if you have a Calendula plant growing in your garden, there's more good news for you. Calendula flowers have healing potential and are used to make medicines, according to WebMD. The flowers can also reduce muscle spams and give you relief from fever.

"Bright yellow or orange Calendula flowers are known for their antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal properties," said Sian Wild, FlorismartUK florist who grew up in a horticultural family, according to Country Living. "Often used externally to ease inflammation and heal wounds and rashes, they can also be taken internally to stimulate blood circulation and speed up recovery from colds and fevers."

There's more flowery good news

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While all flowers do you good, some have specific properties. For example, a bunch of chrysanthemums could put you in a better mood right away. "Chrysanthemums have been shown to lessen symptoms of worry and stress, and when taken as tea, this flower cools and relaxes our body," said Wild.

If you have trouble sleeping or have anxious thoughts that keep you up at night, you could try jasmine or lavender flowers to help you calm down, which can lead to better sleep. Wild  explains, "Jasmine and lavender are proven to lower stress and anxiety levels, inducing peacefulness, improving sleep and lowering heart rate and so are ideal additions to the bedroom."

References:
https://journals.ashs.org/horttech/view/journals/horttech/18/4/article-p563.xml
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965229917303242
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/147470490500300109
https://www.flowerweb.com/en/article/170671/Behavioral-Study-by-Rutgers-Links-Flowers-to-Emotional-Health
https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-235/calendula
https://www.countryliving.com/uk/wellbeing/g24775482/flowers-mental-health-benefits/