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Woman Shares Bill After Hospital Absurdly Charges Her $11 For Crying During Surgery

Woman Shares Bill After Hospital Absurdly Charges Her $11 For Crying During Surgery

Posting an image of the bill, which categorized her emotional breakdown as "Brief Emotion," she wrote, "Mole removal: $223 Crying: extra."

There are many reports of hospitals charging patients excessive amounts of money irrespective of whether the procedure was complicated or not. Most of the time, these concerns are valid as medical establishments add unreasonable charges and end up insanely increasing the bill. But the word "unreasonable" doesn't even begin to describe the charge an American woman was levied for an obvious emotional reaction. The woman, who goes by the name Midge on Twitter, revealed that she was charged $11 for crying during a mole removal surgery. Posting an image of the bill, which categorized her emotional breakdown as "Brief Emotion," she wrote, "Mole removal: $223 Crying: extra."



 

In follow-up tweets, Midge hilariously added, "I didn’t even get a damn sticker" and "Is a lollipop too much to ask?" People with universal healthcare privileges all across the world were left shocked at the concept of having to pay for surgery and simply could not fathom how anyone could be charged "extra" for showing a moment of emotional vulnerability before a medical procedure. "I can't tell if this is amazing satire or another example of ridiculous medical billing shenanigans," wrote one to which the Midge responded writing, "It's real" along with an American flag emoji. Soon people began criticizing the insane number of charges that people are faced with when they are ill, according to Mirror



 

"I dislike the UK's view of the NHS as a sacred institution, that cannot be even constructively criticized without facing cries of 'stop trying to sell it off/do you want an American-style system?'" shared one. "They were padding your visit to make more money. Very scummy maneuver! They'll add this any time they ask you if you've been depressed recently or about your mental state in general," added another. A third claimed, "This is genuinely the moment when we should collectively down tools. This is the end. Society is broken." 



 

"And somehow universal health care is frowned upon. I'll never understand US medical fees," shared one. There were many who began sharing their own shocking experiences with being charged excessively for something beyond their control. "I woke up while they were taking my wisdom teeth out. Specifically, I woke up while they were hammering on one of my teeth to split it in half. They charged me for the extra anesthesia to put me back under," wrote one user and another added, "I recently had a seizure and was super out of it afterwards so I was charged for 'emotional assist' and when I asked about it the lady was just like 'Yes it says here you were distressed."

While the Twitterverse was fuming with anger there was one user who pointed at the screening code 96127 that was mentioned beside "Brief emotion," and explained that it is short for brief emotional/behavioral assessment. Apparently, this specialized mental health code is billable by a primary healthcare provider as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administration (CMS) approved it in 2015. The fees associated with this code can go up to $25 per administration and is billable for up to four times a year. Just as people were wrapping their heads around the peculiar charge, others began noticing a $2.20 discount for the Brief emotion charge. 



 

"How’s you get a discount on your crying fee? $2.20 off crying would do a lot more for my financial state than quitting avocado toast and making coffee at home has ever done," wondered user Joshua Daniels. "Hey! A 20% emotional discount! Not bad. A lot of people I know discount my emotions at least 80% or more," expressed another, Speaking to Indy100, Midge said that she did not know that her depression screening during her annual physical examination was not covered by her health insurance. "It was basically 10 (or less) questions about mental health," she said describing her evaluation. 



 

Cover image source: Twitter | @mxmclain